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Current Exhibitions

Museum of Indian Arts & Culture

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning
Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning highlights the Museum’s extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and presents all aspects of the stone, from geology, mining and history, to questions of authenticity and value. Hundreds of necklaces, bracelets, belts, rings, earrings, silver boxes and other objects illustrate the stone’s use and its deep significance to the people of the region.  
April 13, 2014 through May 30, 2016
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Landscape of an Artist: Living Treasure Dan Namingha
Public Opening on Sunday, March 20, 2016 Screening of Dan Namingha: Seeking Center in Two Worlds at 1:00p.m. Q&A with Dan Namingha at 2:00p.m. Every year at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s Native Treasures: Indian Arts Festival, the museum chooses to honor an artist as a MIAC Living Treasure. This year, Dan Namingha (Hopi-Tewa) is being honored as the MIAC Living Treasure and 2016 Native Treasures Featured Artist. Born and raised on the Hopi reservation, Dan Namingha’s work is inspired by the Southwest region and subjects within his culture. For the past five decades his work has continuously evolved as he has refined his studio practice by experimenting with different mediums and techniques.  Throughout this evolution, Namingha has employed alterations and abstractions to give the viewer a mere impression or glimpse of the subjects and landscapes.  This process allows him to share sacred aspects of his culture in familiar forms with the public, while still protecting the sanctity of his Hopi and Tewa culture. Namingha’s work has garnered praise and has been well received on both the national and international art scene at numerous exhibitions. This March, MIAC invites you to help us honor Namingha’s achievements and explore the Landscape of an Artist: Living Treasure Dan Namingha.
March 20, 2016 through September 11, 2016
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Life and Art of Innovative Native American Artist and Designer Lloyd Kiva New
This year is the centennial of the birth of seminal Native American artist Lloyd Kiva New, and three Santa Fe arts institutions are celebrating this anniversary in style. Locally, New, a Cherokee, is known as the Institute of American Indian Art’s (IAIA) first artistic director, yet nationally, Native people refer to him as the "Godfather of Native Fashion." Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s career retrospective A New Century: The Life and Legacy of Cherokee Artist and Educator Lloyd "Kiva" New (February 14 through December 30, 2016). A New Century is a mesmerizing look into New’s storied life from his humble beginnings on the family farm in Oklahoma to the burgeoning days at IAIA. In between he strides the decks of the USS Sanborn during World War II and the halls of the Art Institute of Chicago. Opening successive and successful boutiques and craft centers in the gleaming post-war enclave of Scottsdale, Arizona. New was a pioneer in the worlds of fashion, entrepreneurship, and Native art instruction. His vision of cultural studies and creative arts education continues to influence and inspire. Through personal recollections, photos, archival documents, and objects pour la couture, New Century: The Life and Legacy of Cherokee Artist and Educator Lloyd "Kiva" New reviews the life of this American Indian visionary. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, and the New Mexico Museum of Art will each present an exhibition in 2016 focusing on key aspects of Lloyd Kiva New’s (b. 1916 - d. 2002) significant contributions to contemporary Native culture. Additionally, the three institutions are planning a symposium, multiple lectures, panel discussions, a fashion show, Gala, and, as pure celebration, a 100th birthday party.
February 14, 2016 through December 30, 2016
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography, and Time
For the first time in Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography, and Time, large prints of Heisey’s stunning images will be paired directly with the Lindberghs’. The exhibition opens October 25, 2015 and runs through May 2017 at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. During 2007 and 2008, flying at alarmingly low altitudes and slow speeds, Adriel Heisey leaned out the door of his light plane, and holding his camera with both hands, re-photographed some of the Southwest’s most significant archaeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his new bride Anne photographed in 1929.
October 25, 2015 through May 25, 2017
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery
The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.
on long-term display
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Here, Now and Always
Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest's indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum's collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.
on long-term display
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Museum of International Folk Art

Under Pressure:
The Gallery of Conscience is an experimental gallery in the Museum of International Folk Art where the public is invited to help shape the content and form of the exhibition in real tme.
May 3, 2016 through July 1, 2016
Museum of International Folk Art

The Morris Miniature Circus: Return of the Little Big Top
Built over the course of forty years by W.J. “Windy” Morris (1904–1978) of Amarillo, Texas, the Morris Miniature Circus is a 3/8”-scale circus model that was acquired by the museum in 1984 and exhibited in 1986. In 2016, the museum will restore and install the Circus once again.
April 3, 2016 through January 1, 2017
Museum of International Folk Art

Sacred Realm: Blessings & Good Fortune Across Asia
 What more can we ask than for blessings and good fortune? Whether perceived as miraculous boons or a response to ceremonious prayer, blessings and good fortune come in many forms and bring joy, comfort, and balance to our lives. God, deities, nature spirits, and other unseen forces exist in human belief, which can bring both great harm and great fortune to people on earth.
February 28, 2016 through March 19, 2017
Museum of International Folk Art

FLAMENCO: From Spain to New Mexico
Passionate, fiery, sensual, intense In-depth examination of the history and culture of flamenco dance and music. The Museum of International Folk Art presents Flamenco: From Spain to New Mexico, the most comprehensive exhibition to celebrate and study this living tradition as an art form. The exhibition opened November 22, 2015 and runs through September 10, 2017.  More than 150 objects are featured. Among them, items once used by renowned artists Encarnación López y Júlvez “La Argentinita”, José Greco, and Vicente Romero and María Benítez (both from New Mexico). In addition to other stunning loans from private collectors will be those from the museum’s expansive permanent collection.
November 22, 2015 through September 10, 2017
Museum of International Folk Art

Multiple Visions: A Common Bond
"I believe we should preserve this evidence of the past, not as a pattern for sentimental imitation, but as nourishment for the creative spirit of the present." - Alexander Girard
on long-term display
Museum of International Folk Art

Museum of Art

Assumed Identities: Photographs by Anne Noggle
Pilot, photographer, professor, and poet, Anne Noggle (1922-2005) began  her groundbreaking career as a photographer late in life but quickly gained recognition for her witty and honest work. Assumed Identities: Photographs by Anne Noggle opens at the New Mexico Museum of Art on Saturday, April 2, 2016 and runs through September 11, 2016. A free to the public opening is on Friday, April 1 from 5.30 to 7.30pm.
April 2, 2016 through September 11, 2016
New Mexico Museum of Art

Finding a Contemporary Voice: The Legacy of Lloyd Kiva New and IAIA
Taking a Fritz Scholder group portrait of IAIA faculty and the legacy of the institution’s first artistic director, Lloyd Kiva New, as starting points, Finding a Contemporary Voice: the Legacy of Lloyd Kiva New and IAIA includes work from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s collection by IAIA faculty and alumni from the 1960s to the present such as Scholder, Neil Parsons, T.C. Cannon, Melanie Yazzie, Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie, and Will Wilson. The Museum of Art’s free to the public exhibition opening is on Friday, May 20, 2016 and the exhibition runs through Oct. 10, 2016. Finding a Contemporary Voice complements concurrent exhibitions at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (A New Century: The Life and Legacy of Cherokee Artist and Educator Lloyd "Kiva" New) and the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Art Lloyd Kiva New: Art, Design, and Influence. All three exhibitions and associated symposia, lectures, and other events celebrate the centennial of Native American artist Lloyd Kiva New’s birth by focusing on key aspects of his significant contributions to contemporary Native culture.
May 21, 2016 through October 10, 2016
New Mexico Museum of Art

ALCOVES 16/17
Alcoves 16/17 opens March 4, 2016 at the New Mexico Museum of Art. This will be the first in a series of seven alcove exhibitions that concludes on March 26, 2017. Each of the seven rotations will highlight five artists at various career stages and working in New Mexico today. In this first of seven exhibitions, artists working in all media will be featured; Scott Anderson, Gloria Graham, Scott Greene, Herbert Lotz, and Bonnie Lynch.  
March 4, 2016 through March 26, 2017
New Mexico Museum of Art

New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors

Along the Pecos
One of the staples of desert life is the presence—or scarcity—of water. Its importance can be seen across eastern New Mexico, where the Pecos River strives to quench a fragile, 926-mile riparian environment. Along the Pecos, a collage of photographs and sounds, opens June 19 on the second floor of the New Mexico History Museum. Developed by photographer Jennifer Schlesinger and the late composer Steven M. Miller, the materials were recently donated to the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives, whose Photo Legacy Project collects the work of contemporary photographers.
June 19, 2015 through July 25, 2016
New Mexico History Museum

Santa Fe Faces: Alan Pearlman Photographs
In 2009, photographer Alan Pearlman set out on a quest to capture the soul of Santa Fe in a series of staged portraits. Some of the results take center stage as archival pigment prints in the New Mexico History Museum’s Mezzanine Gallery, March 13–September 18, 2016. Santa Fe Faces: Alan Pearlman Photographs features a selection from 90 portraits he took between 2009 and 2013. Included among them are images of flamenco artist Juan Siddi and Turquoise Trail rancher Archie West. Through them, Pearlman aimed to reveal a moment in the City Different’s history, focusing on the ways that clothing and settings speak to identities and occupations.
March 13, 2016 through September 18, 2016
New Mexico History Museum

Fractured Faiths: Spanish Judaism, The Inquisition, and New World Identities
In 1492, Spain’s King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella issued a royal edict ordering all Jews to either leave the country or convert to Catholicism. The Spanish Inquisition (and later, the Portugese and Mexican Inquisitions) stood ready to persecute anyone who failed to abide. Violators would endure prisons, torture and death. Fractured Faiths: Spanish Judaism, The Inquisition, and New World Identities, opening May 22, 2016, leaps into the ensuing diaspora, a journey that stretches back to biblical times. For the first time, a major institution tells the comprehensive story of how Spain’s Jewry found a tenuous foothold in North America. Despite continued persecution, its people persisted—sometimes as upright Catholic conversos, sometimes as self-identifying “crypto-Jews.”
May 22, 2016 through December 31, 2016
New Mexico History Museum

Lowriders, Hoppers, and Hot Rods: Car Culture of Northern New Mexico
¡Orale! Take a ride into the creative reimaginings of American steel as captured in photographs, hubcaps, hood ornaments, car show banners and, yes, actual cars. Lowriders, Hoppers, and Hot Rods: Car Culture of Northern New Mexico, opening May 1 (through March 5, 2017) at the New Mexico History Museum focuses on mobile works of art and their makers—home-grown Nuevomexicanos who customize, detail, paint and upholster these favorite symbols of Hispanic culture. Photo Curator Daniel Kosharek has pulled together an extensive collection of images by Don Usner, Annie Sahlin, Jack Parsons, Sam Adams, Norman Mauskopf, Dottie Lopez, Gabriela Campos, Meridel Rubinstein and others. In addition, the exhibit features a chromed and touchable engine, miniature-scale model-car collections, trophies, memorabilia and other ephemera. The museum lobby will host a rotating selection of cherry examples. The thrill ride doesn’t stop there.
May 1, 2016 through March 5, 2017
New Mexico History Museum

Segesser Hide Paintings
Though the source of the Segesser Hide Paintings is obscure, their significance cannot be clearer: the hides are rare examples of the earliest known depictions of colonial life in the United States. Moreover, the tanned and smoothed hides carry the very faces of men whose descendants live in New Mexico today...
on long-term display
New Mexico History Museum

Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time
Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital. Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.
on long-term display
New Mexico History Museum

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now
Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today's residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists. 
on long-term display
New Mexico History Museum

Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción
Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos dating from the late 1700s to 1900 which illustrate the distinctive tradition of santo making in New Mexico introduced by settlers from Mexico.
on long-term display
New Mexico History Museum

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy
Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry. Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.
on long-term display
New Mexico History Museum

Upcoming Exhibitions

Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art
opens July 17, 2016
at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Agnes Martin and Me
opens August 5, 2016
at the New Mexico History Museum

Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar
opens October 7, 2016
at the New Mexico History Museum

In Search of Dominguez and Escalante
opens December 18, 2016
at the New Mexico History Museum

Diego Romero vs the End of Art
opens February 12, 2017
at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

No Idle Hands: The Makers & Myths of Tramp Art
opens March 12, 2017
at the Museum of International Folk Art

Quilts of Southwest China
opens July 2, 2017
at the Museum of International Folk Art

Nurturing Memory/Cultivating Tradition:
opens December 10, 2017
at the Museum of International Folk Art

Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia
opens December 10, 2018
at the Museum of International Folk Art